Fra Bjovulf-kvadet - oldengelsk version med engelsk oversættelse (700-tallet) 

[nudansk version]

 

1 Hwæt. We Gardena in geardagum,
LO, praise of the prowess of people-kings
2 þeodcyninga, þrym gefrunon,
of spear-armed Danes, in days long sped,
3 hu ða æþelingas ellen fremedon.
we have heard, and what honor the athelings won!
4 Oft Scyld Scefing sceaþena/ þreatum,
Oft Scyld the Scefing from squadroned foes,
5 monegum mægþum, meodosetla ofteah,
from many a tribe, the mead-bench tore,
6 egsode eorlas. Syððan ærest wearð/
awing the earls. Since erst he lay
7 feasceaft funden, he þæs frofre gebad,
friendless, a foundling, fate repaid him:
8 weox under wolcnum, weorðmyndum þah,
for he waxed under welkin, in wealth he throve,
9 oðþæt him æghwylc þara ymbsittendra
till before him the folk, both far and near,
10 ofer hronrade hyran scolde,
who house by the whale-path, heard his mandate,
11 gomban gyldan. þæt wæs god cyning.
gave him gifts: a good king he!
12 ðæm eafera wæs æfter cenned,
To him an heir was afterward born,
13 geong in geardum, þone god sende
a son in his halls, whom heaven sent
14 folce to frofre; fyrenðearfe ongeat
to favor the folk, feeling their woe
15 þe hie ær drugon aldorlease/
that erst they had lacked an earl for leader
16 lange hwile. Him þæs liffrea,
so long a while; the Lord endowed him,
17 wuldres wealdend, woroldare forgeaf;
the Wielder of Wonder, with world's renown.
18 Beowulf wæs breme blæd wide sprang/,
Famed was this Beowulf: far flew the boast of him,
19 Scyldes eafera Scedelandum in.
son of Scyld, in the Scandian lands.
20 Swa sceal geong/ guma/ gode gewyrcean,
So becomes it a youth to quit him well
21 fromum feohgiftum on fæder bearme/,
with his father's friends, by fee and gift,
22 þæt hine on ylde eft gewunigen
that to aid him, aged, in after days,
23 wilgesiþas, þonne wig cume,
come warriors willing, should war draw nigh,
24 leode gelæsten; lofdædum sceal
liegemen loyal: by lauded deeds
25 in mægþa gehwære man geþeon.
shall an earl have honor in every clan.

[...]

64 þa wæs Hroðgare heresped gyfen,
To Hrothgar was given such glory of war,
65 wiges weorðmynd, þæt him his winemagas
such honor of combat, that all his kin
66 georne hyrdon, oðð þæt seo geogoð geweox,
obeyed him gladly till great grew his band
67 magodriht micel. Him on mod bearn
of youthful comrades. It came in his mind
68 þæt healreced hatan wolde,
to bid his henchmen a hall uprear,
69 medoærn/ micel, men gewyrcean
a master mead-house, mightier far
70 þonne/ yldo bearn æfre gefrunon,
than ever was seen by the sons of earth,
71 ond þær on innan eall gedælan
and within it, then, to old and young
72 geongum ond ealdum, swylc him god sealde,
he would all allot that the Lord had sent him,
73 buton folcscare ond feorum gumena.
save only the land and the lives of his men.
74 ða ic wide gefrægn weorc gebannan
Wide, I heard, was the work commanded,
75 manigre mægþe geond þisne middangeard,
for many a tribe this mid-earth round,
76 folcstede frætwan. Him on fyrste gelomp,
to fashion the folkstead. It fell, as he ordered,
77 ædre mid yldum, þæt hit wearð ealgearo,
in rapid achievement that ready it stood there,
78 healærna mæst; scop him Heort naman
of halls the noblest: Heorot he named it
79 se þe his wordes geweald wide hæfde.
whose message had might in many a land.

[...]

115 Gewat ða neosian, syþðan niht becom,
WENT he forth to find at fall of night
116 hean huses, hu hit Hringdene
that haughty house, and heed wherever
117 æfter beorþege gebun hæfdon.
the Ring-Danes, outrevelled, to rest had gone.
118 Fand þa ðær inne æþelinga gedriht
Found within it the atheling band
119 swefan æfter symble; sorge ne cuðon,
asleep after feasting and fearless of sorrow,
120 wonsceaft wera. Wiht unhælo,
of human hardship. Unhallowed wight,
121 grim ond grædig, gearo sona wæs,
grim and greedy, he grasped betimes,
122 reoc ond reþe, ond on ræste genam
wrathful, reckless, from resting-places,
123 þritig þegna, þanon eft gewat
thirty of the thanes, and thence he rushed
124 huðe hremig to ham faran,
fain of his fell spoil, faring homeward,
125 mid þære wælfylle wica neosan.
laden with slaughter, his lair to seek.

[...]

149 sidra sorga. Forðam secgum/ wearð,
boundless cares. There came unhidden
150 ylda bearnum, undyrne cuð,
tidings true to the tribes of men,
151 gyddum geomore, þætte Grendel wan
in sorrowful songs, how ceaselessly Grendel
152 hwile wið Hroþgar, heteniðas wæg,
harassed Hrothgar, what hate he bore him,
153 fyrene ond fæhðe fela missera,
what murder and massacre, many a year,
154 singale sæce, sibbe ne wolde
feud unfading, -- refused consent
155 wið manna hwone mægenes Deniga,
to deal with any of Daneland's earls,
156 feorhbealo feorran, fea þingian,
make pact of peace, or compound for gold:
157 ne þær nænig witena wenan þorfte
still less did the wise men ween to get
158 beorhtre bote to banan/ folmum,
great fee for the feud from his fiendish hands.

[...]

237 Hwæt syndon ge searohæbbendra,
"Who are ye, then, ye armed men,
238 byrnum werede, þe þus brontne ceol
mailed folk, that yon mighty vessel
239 ofer lagustræte lædan cwomon,
have urged thus over the ocean ways,
240 hider ofer holmas? le/ wæs
here o'er the waters? A warden I,
241 endesæta, ægwearde heold,
sentinel set o'er the sea-march here,
242 þe on land Dena laðra nænig
lest any foe to the folk of Danes
243 mid scipherge sceðþan ne meahte.
with harrying fleet should harm the land.
244 No her cuðlicor cuman ongunnon
No aliens ever at ease thus bore them,
245 lindhæbbende; ne ge leafnesword
linden-wielders: yet word-of-leave
246 guðfremmendra gearwe ne wisson,
clearly ye lack from clansmen here,
247 maga gemedu. Næfre ic maran geseah
my folk's agreement. -- A greater ne'er saw I
248 eorla ofer eorþan ðonne is eower sum,
of warriors in world than is one of you, --
249 secg on searwum; nis þæt seldguma,
yon hero in harness! No henchman he
250 wæpnum geweorðad, næfne/ him his wlite leoge,
worthied by weapons, if witness his features,
251 ænlic ansyn. Nu ic eower sceal
his peerless presence! I pray you, though, tell
252 frumcyn witan, ær ge fyr heonan ,
your folk and home, lest hence ye fare
253 leassceaweras, on land Dena
suspect to wander your way as spies
254 furþur feran. Nu ge feorbuend,
in Danish land. Now, dwellers afar,
255 mereliðende, minne/ gehyrað
ocean-travellers, take from me
256 anfealdne geþoht: Ofost is selest
simple advice: the sooner the better
257 to gecyðanne hwanan eowre cyme syndon.
I hear of the country whence ye came."

[...]

267 We þurh holdne hige hlaford þinne,
To thy lord and liege in loyal mood
268 sunu Healfdenes, secean cwomon,
we hasten hither, to Healfdene's son,
269 leodgebyrgean; wes þu us larena god.
people-protector: be pleased to advise us!
270 Habbað we to þæm mæran micel ærende,
To that mighty-one come we on mickle errand,
271 Deniga frean, [...]
to the lord of the Danes; [...]

[...]

Beowulf is min nama.
fellows at board; I am Beowulf named.
344 Wille ic asecgan sunu Healfdenes,
I am seeking to say to the son of Healfdene
345 mærum þeodne, min ærende,
this mission of mine, to thy master-lord,
346 aldre þinum, gif he us geunnan wile
the doughty prince, if he deign at all
347 þæt we hine swa godne gretan moton.
grace that we greet him, the good one, now."
348 Wulfgar maþelode þæt wæs Wendla leod;
Wulfgar spake, the Wendles' chieftain,
349 wæs his modsefa manegum gecyðed,
whose might of mind to many was known,
350 wig ond wisdom: Ic þæs wine Deniga,
his courage and counsel: "The king of Danes,
351 frean Scildinga, frinan wille,
the Scyldings' friend, I fain will tell,
352 beaga bryttan, swa þu bena eart,
the Breaker-of-Rings, as the boon thou askest,
353 þeoden mærne, ymb þinne sið,
the famed prince, of thy faring hither,
354 ond þe þa ondsware ædre gecyðan
and, swiftly after, such answer bring
355 ðe me se goda agifan þenceð.
as the doughty monarch may deign to give."
356 Hwearf þa hrædlice þær Hroðgar sæt
Hied then in haste to where Hrothgar sat
357 eald ond anhar/ mid his eorla gedriht;
white-haired and old, his earls about him,
358 eode ellenrof, þæt he for eaxlum gestod
till the stout thane stood at the shoulder there
359 Deniga frean; cuþe he duguðe þeaw.
of the Danish king: good courtier he!
360 Wulfgar maðelode to his/ winedrihtne:
Wulfgar spake to his winsome lord:--
361 Her syndon geferede, feorran cumene
"Hither have fared to thee far-come men
362 ofer geofenes begang Geata leode;
o'er the paths of ocean, people of Geatland;
363 þone yldestan oretmecgas
and the stateliest there by his sturdy band
364 Beowulf nemnað. [...]
is Beowulf named. [...]

[...]

381 [...] Hine halig god
Blessed God
382 for arstafum us onsende,
out of his mercy this man hath sent
383 to Westdenum, þæs ic wen hæbbe,
to Danes of the West, as I ween indeed,
384 wið Grendles gryre. Ic þæm/ godan sceal
against horror of Grendel. I hope to give
385 for his modþræce madmas beodan.
the good youth gold for his gallant thought.
386 Beo ðu on ofeste, hat in gan
Be thou in haste, and bid them hither,
387 seon sibbegedriht samod ætgædere;
clan of kinsmen, to come before me;
388 gesaga him eac wordum þæt hie sint wilcuman
and add this word, -- they are welcome guests
389 Deniga leodum.
to folk of the Danes." [To the door of the hall
390 [ ] word/ inne abead:
Wulfgar went] and the word declared:--
391 Eow het secgan sigedrihten min,
"To you this message my master sends,
392 aldor Eastdena, þæt he eower æþelu can,
East-Danes' king, that your kin he knows,
393 ond ge him syndon ofer sæwylmas
hardy heroes, and hails you all
394 heardhicgende hider wilcuman.
welcome hither o'er waves of the sea!

[...]

409 [...] Me wearð Grendles þing

These Grendel-deeds
410 on minre eþeltyrf undyrne cuð;
I heard in my home-land heralded clear.
411 secgað sæliðend þæt þæs sele stande,
Seafarers say how stands this hall,
412 reced selesta, rinca gehwylcum
of buildings best, for your band of thanes
413 idel ond unnyt, siððan æfenleoht
empty and idle, when evening sun
414 under heofenes hador beholen weorþeð.
in the harbor of heaven is hidden away.
415 þa me þæt gelærdon leode mine
So my vassals advised me well, --
416 þa selestan, snotere ceorlas,
brave and wise, the best of men, --
417 þeoden Hroðgar, þæt ic þe sohte,
O sovran Hrothgar, to seek thee here,
418 forþan hie mægenes cræft minne/ cuþon,
for my nerve and my might they knew full well.

[...]

426 [...] Ic þe nu ða,
in single battle! So, from thee,
427 brego Beorhtdena, biddan wille,
thou sovran of the Shining-Danes,
428 eodor Scyldinga, anre bene,
Scyldings'-bulwark, a boon I seek, --
429 þæt ðu me ne forwyrne, wigendra hleo,
and, Friend-of-the-folk, refuse it not,
430 freowine folca, nu ic þus feorran com,
O Warriors'-shield, now I've wandered far, --
431 þæt ic mote ana ond/ minra eorla gedryht,
that I alone with my liegemen here,
432 þes hearda heap, Heorot fælsian.
this hardy band, may Heorot purge!

[...]

459 Gesloh þin fæder fæhðe mæste;
Thy father's combat a feud enkindled
460 wearþ he Heaþolafe to handbonan
when Heatholaf with hand he slew
461 mid Wilfingum; ða hine Wedera/ cyn
among the Wylfings; his Weder kin
462 for herebrogan habban ne mihte.
for horror of fighting feared to hold him.
463 þanon he gesohte Suðdena folc
Fleeing, he sought our South-Dane folk,
464 ofer yða gewealc, Arscyldinga.
over surge of ocean the Honor-Scyldings,
465 ða ic furþum weold folce Deniga/
when first I was ruling the folk of Danes,
466 ond on geogoðe heold ginne/ rice,
wielded, youthful, this widespread realm,
467 hordburh hæleþa [...]
this hoard-hold of heroes.

[...]

489 Site nu to symle ond onsæl meoto,
-- But sit to the banquet, unbind thy words,
490 sigehreð secgum, swa þin sefa hwette.
hardy hero, as heart shall prompt thee."
491 þa wæs Geatmæcgum geador ætsomne
Gathered together, the Geatish men
492 on beorsele benc gerymed;
in the banquet-hall on bench assigned,
493 þær swiðferhþe sittan eodon,
sturdy-spirited, sat them down,
494 þryðum dealle. þegn nytte beheold,
hardy-hearted. A henchman attended,
495 se þe on handa bær hroden ealowæge,
carried the carven cup in hand,
496 scencte scir wered. Scop hwilum sang
served the clear mead. Oft minstrels sang
497 hador on Heorote. þær wæs hæleða dream,
blithe in Heorot. Heroes revelled,
498 duguð unlytel Dena ond Wedera.
no dearth of warriors, Weder and Dane.

[...]

590 Secge ic þe to soðe, sunu Ecglafes/,
For I say in sooth, thou son of Ecglaf,
591 þæt næfre Grendel/ swa fela gryra gefremede,
never had Grendel these grim deeds wrought,
592 atol æglæca, ealdre þinum,
monster dire, on thy master dear,
593 hynðo on Heorote, gif þin hige wære,
in Heorot such havoc, if heart of thine
594 sefa swa searogrim, swa þu self talast.
were as battle-bold as thy boast is loud!
595 Ac he hafað onfunden þæt he þa fæhðe ne þearf,
But he has found no feud will happen;
596 atole ecgþræce eower leode
from sword-clash dread of your Danish clan
597 swiðe onsittan, Sigescyldinga;
he vaunts him safe, from the Victor-Scyldings.
598 nymeð nydbade, nænegum arað
He forces pledges, favors none
599 leode Deniga, ac he lust wigeð,
of the land of Danes, but lustily murders,
600 swefeð ond sendeþ, secce ne weneþ
fights and feasts, nor feud he dreads
601 to Gardenum. Ac ic him Geata sceal
from Spear-Dane men. But speedily now
602 eafoð ond ellen ungeara nu,
shall I prove him the prowess and pride of the Geats,
603 guþe gebeodan. Gæþ eft se þe mot
shall bid him battle. Blithe to mead
604 to medo modig, siþþan morgenleoht
go he that listeth, when light of dawn
605 ofer ylda bearn oþres dogores,
this morrow morning o'er men of earth,
606 sunne sweglwered suþan scineð.
ether-robed sun from the south shall beam!"
607 þa wæs on salum sinces brytta,
Joyous then was the Jewel-giver,
608 gamolfeax ond guðrof; geoce gelyfde
hoar-haired, war-brave; help awaited
609 brego Beorhtdena, gehyrde on Beowulfe
the Bright-Danes' prince, from Beowulf hearing,
610 folces hyrde fæstrædne geþoht.
folk's good shepherd, such firm resolve.
611 ðær wæs hæleþa hleahtor/, hlyn swynsode,
Then was laughter of liegemen loud resounding
612 word wæron wynsume. Eode Wealhþeow forð,
with winsome words. Came Wealhtheow forth,
613 cwen Hroðgares, cynna gemyndig,
queen of Hrothgar, heedful of courtesy,
614 grette goldhroden guman on healle,
gold-decked, greeting the guests in hall;
615 ond þa freolic wif ful gesealde
and the high-born lady handed the cup
616 ærest Eastdena eþelwearde,
first to the East-Danes' heir and warden,
617 bæd hine bliðne æt þære beorþege,
bade him be blithe at the beer-carouse,
618 leodum leofne. He on lust geþeah
the land's beloved one. Lustily took he
619 symbel ond seleful, sigerof kyning.
banquet and beaker, battle-famed king.

[...]

642 þa wæs eft swa ær inne on healle
Again, as erst, began in hall
643 þryðword sprecen, ðeod on sælum,
warriors' wassail and words of power,
644 sigefolca sweg, oþþæt semninga
the proud-band's revel, till presently
645 sunu Healfdenes secean wolde
the son of Healfdene hastened to seek
646 æfenræste; wiste þæm ahlæcan
rest for the night; he knew there waited
647 to þæm heahsele hilde geþinged,
fight for the fiend in that festal hall,
648 siððan hie sunnan leoht geseon ne/ meahton,
when the sheen of the sun they saw no more,
649 oðþe nipende niht ofer ealle,
and dusk of night sank darkling nigh,
650 scaduhelma gesceapu scriðan cwoman,
and shadowy shapes came striding on,
651 wan under wolcnum. Werod eall aras.
wan under welkin. The warriors rose.
652 Gegrette/ þa guma oþerne,
Man to man, he made harangue,
653 Hroðgar Beowulf, ond him hæl abead,
Hrothgar to Beowulf, bade him hail,
654 winærnes geweald, ond þæt word acwæð:
let him wield the wine hall: a word he added:--
655 Næfre ic ænegum men ær alyfde,
"Never to any man erst I trusted,
656 siþðan ic hond ond rond hebban mihte,
since I could heave up hand and shield,
657 ðryþærn Dena buton þe nu ða.
this noble Dane-Hall, till now to thee.
658 Hafa nu ond geheald husa selest,
Have now and hold this house unpeered;
659 gemyne mærþo, mægenellen cyð,
remember thy glory; thy might declare;
660 waca wið wraþum. Ne bið þe wilna gad,
watch for the foe! No wish shall fail thee
661 gif þu þæt ellenweorc aldre gedigest.
if thou bidest the battle with bold-won life."

[...]

688 Hylde hine þa heaþodeor, hleorbolster onfeng
Reclined then the chieftain, and cheek-pillows held
689 eorles andwlitan, ond hine ymb monig
the head of the earl, while all about him
690 snellic særinc selereste gebeah.
seamen hardy on hall-beds sank.
691 Nænig heora þohte þæt he þanon scolde
None of them thought that thence their steps
692 eft eardlufan æfre gesecean,
to the folk and fastness that fostered them,
693 folc oþðe freoburh, þær he afeded wæs;
to the land they loved, would lead them back!
694 ac hie hæfdon gefrunen þæt hie ær to fela micles
Full well they wist that on warriors many
695 in þæm winsele wældeað fornam,
battle-death seized, in the banquet-hall,
696 Denigea leode. [...]

of Danish clan. [...]

[...]

765 [...] þæt/ wæs geocor sið
[...] Gruesome march
766 þæt se hearmscaþa to Heorute ateah.
to Heorot this monster of harm had made!
767 Dryhtsele dynede; Denum eallum wearð,
Din filled the room; the Danes were bereft,
768 ceasterbuendum, cenra gehwylcum,
castle-dwellers and clansmen all,
769 eorlum ealuscerwen.[...]
earls, of their ale. [...]

 

[...]

782 [...] Sweg up astag
[...] Again uprose
783 niwe geneahhe; Norðdenum stod
din redoubled. Danes of the North
784 atelic egesa, anra gehwylcum
with fear and frenzy were filled, each one,
785 þara þe of wealle wop gehyrdon,
who from the wall that wailing heard,
786 gryreleoð galan godes ondsacan,
God's foe sounding his grisly song,
787 sigeleasne sang, sar wanigean
cry of the conquered, clamorous pain
788 helle hæfton. [...]
from captive of hell. [...]

[...]

823 [...] Denum eallum wearð
[...] To all the Danes
824 æfter þam wælræse willa gelumpen.
by that bloody battle the boon had come.
825 Hæfde þa gefælsod se þe ær feorran com,
From ravage had rescued the roving stranger
826 snotor ond swyðferhð, sele Hroðgares,
Hrothgar's hall; the hardy and wise one
827 genered wið niðe; nihtweorce gefeh,
had purged it anew. His night-work pleased him,
828 ellenmærþum/. Hæfde Eastdenum
his deed and its honor. To Eastern Danes
829 Geatmecga leod gilp gelæsted,
had the valiant Geat his vaunt made good,
830 swylce oncyþðe ealle gebette,
all their sorrow and ills assuaged,
831 inwidsorge, þe hie ær drugon
their bale of battle borne so long,
832 ond for þreanydum þolian scoldon,
and all the dole they erst endured
833 torn unlytel. [...]

pain a-plenty. [...]

[...]

1279 Com þa to Heorote, ðær Hringdene
To Heorot came she, where helmeted Danes
1280 geond þæt sæld swæfun. þa ðær sona wearð
slept in the hall. Too soon came back
1281 edhwyrft eorlum, siþðan inne fealh
old ills of the earls, when in she burst,
1282 Grendles modor. Wæs se gryre læssa
the mother of Grendel.

[...]

1321 Hroðgar maþelode, helm Scyldinga:
HROTHGAR spake, helmet-of-Scyldings:--
1322 Ne frin þu æfter sælum. Sorh is geniwod
"Ask not of pleasure! Pain is renewed
1323 Denigea leodum. Dead is æschere,
to Danish folk. Dead is Aeschere,
1324 Yrmenlafes yldra broþor,
of Yrmenlaf the elder brother,
1325 min runwita ond min rædbora,
my sage adviser and stay in council,
1326 eaxlgestealla, ðonne we on orlege
shoulder-comrade in stress of fight

[...]

1419 [...] Denum eallum wæs,

[...] The Danish men
1418 winum Scyldinga, weorce on mode
had sorrow of soul, and for Scyldings all,
1419 to geþolianne, ðegne monegum,
for many a hero, 'twas hard to bear,
1420 oncyð eorla gehwæm, syðþan æscheres
ill for earls, when Aeschere's head
1421 on þam holmclife hafelan metton.
they found by the flood on the foreland there.

[...]

1584 [...] He æfter recede wlat;
[...] The hall he scanned.
1573 hwearf þa be wealle, wæpen hafenade
By the wall then went he; his weapon raised
1574 heard be hiltum Higelaces ðegn,
high by its hilts the Hygelac-thane,
1575 yrre ond anræd. Næs seo ecg fracod
angry and eager. That edge was not useless
1576 hilderince, ac he hraþe wolde
to the warrior now. He wished with speed
1577 Grendle forgyldan guðræsa fela
Grendel to guerdon for grim raids many,
1578 ðara þe he geworhte to Westdenum
for the war he waged on Western-Danes
1579 oftor micle ðonne on ænne sið,
oftener far than an only time,
1580 þonne he Hroðgares heorðgeneatas
when of Hrothgar's hearth-companions
1581 sloh on sweofote, slæpende fræt
he slew in slumber, in sleep devoured,
1582 folces Denigea fyftyne men
fifteen men of the folk of Danes,
1583 ond oðer swylc ut offerede,
and as many others outward bore,
1584 laðlicu lac. [...]
his horrible prey. [...]

[...]

1666 [...] þa þæt hildebil
[...] That war-sword then
1667 forbarn brogdenmæl, swa þæt blod gesprang,
all burned, bright blade, when the blood gushed o'er it,
1668 hatost heaþoswata. Ic þæt hilt þanan
battle-sweat hot; but the hilt I brought back
1669 feondum ætferede, fyrendæda wræc,
from my foes. So avenged I their fiendish deeds
1670 deaðcwealm Denigea, swa hit gedefe wæs.
death-fall of Danes, as was due and right.
1671 Ic hit þe þonne gehate, þæt þu on Heorote most
And this is my hest, that in Heorot now
1672 sorhleas swefan mid þinra secga gedryht
safe thou canst sleep with thy soldier band,
1673 ond þegna gehwylc þinra leoda,
and every thane of all thy folk
1674 duguðe ond iogoþe, þæt þu him ondrædan ne þearft,
both old and young; no evil fear,
1675 þeoden Scyldinga, on þa healfe,
Scyldings' lord, from that side again,
1676 aldorbealu eorlum, swa þu ær dydest.
aught ill for thy earls, as erst thou must!"
1677 ða wæs gylden hilt gamelum rince,
Then the golden hilt, for that gray-haired leader,
1678 harum hildfruman, on hand gyfen,
hoary hero, in hand was laid,
1679 enta ærgeweorc. hit on æht gehwearf
giant-wrought, old. So owned and enjoyed it
1680 æfter deofla hryre Denigea frean,
after downfall of devils, the Danish lord,
1681 wundorsmiþa geweorc [...]

wonder-smiths' work [...]

[...]

1703 [...] Blæd is aræred
[...] So, borne aloft,
1704 geond widwegas, wine min Beowulf/,
thy fame must fly, O friend my Beowulf,
1705 ðin ofer þeoda gehwylce. Eal þu hit geþyldum healdest,
far and wide o'er folksteads many. Firmly thou shalt all maintain,
1706 mægen mid modes snyttrum. Ic þe sceal mine gelæstan
mighty strength with mood of wisdom. Love of mine will I assure thee,
1707 freode, swa wit furðum spræcon. ðu scealt to frofre weorþan
as, awhile ago, I promised; thou shalt prove a stay in future,
1708 eal langtwidig leodum þinum,
in far-off years, to folk of thine,
1709 hæleðum to helpe. Ne wearð Heremod swa
to the heroes a help. Was not Heremod thus
1710 eaforum Ecgwelan, Arscyldingum;
to offspring of Ecgwela, Honor-Scyldings,
1711 ne geweox he him to willan, ac to wælfealle
nor grew for their grace, but for grisly slaughter,
1712 ond to deaðcwalum Deniga leodum;
for doom of death to the Danishmen.
1713 breat bolgenmod beodgeneatas,
He slew, wrath-swollen, his shoulder-comrades,
1714 eaxlgesteallan, oþþæt he ana hwearf,
companions at board! So he passed alone,
1715 mære þeoden, mondreamum from.
chieftain haughty, from human cheer.
1716 ðeah þe hine mihtig god mægenes wynnum,
Though him the Maker with might endowed,
1717 eafeþum stepte, ofer ealle men
delights of power, and uplifted high
1718 forð gefremede, hwæþere him on ferhþe greow
above all men, yet blood-fierce his mind,
1719 breosthord blodreow. Nallas beagas geaf
his breast-hoard, grew, no bracelets gave he
1720 Denum æfter dome; dreamleas gebad
to Danes as was due; he endured all joyless
1721 þæt he þæs gewinnes weorc þrowade,
strain of struggle and stress of woe,
1722 leodbealo longsum. ðu þe lær be þon,
long feud with his folk. Here find thy lesson!
1723 gumcyste ongit; ic þis gid be þe
Of virtue advise thee! This verse I have said for thee,
1724 awræc wintrum frod. Wundor is to secganne
wise from lapsed winters. Wondrous seems
1725 hu mihtig god manna cynne
how to sons of men Almighty God

[...]

1769 Swa ic Hringdena hund missera
So the Ring-Danes these half-years a hundred I ruled,
1770 weold under wolcnum ond hig wigge beleac/
wielded 'neath welkin, and warded them bravely
1771 manigum mægþa geond þysne middangeard/,
from mighty-ones many o'er middle-earth,
1772 æscum ond ecgum, þæt ic me ænigne
from spear and sword, till it seemed for me
1773 under swegles begong gesacan ne tealde.
no foe could be found under fold of the sky.
1774 Hwæt, me þæs on eþle edwenden/ cwom,
Lo, sudden the shift! To me seated secure
1775 gyrn æfter gomene, seoþðan Grendel wearð,
came grief for joy when Grendel began
1776 ealdgewinna, ingenga min;
to harry my home, the hellish foe;

[...]

1813 Ond þa siðfrome, searwum gearwe
Now eager for parting and armed at point
1814 wigend wæron; eode weorð Denum
warriors waited, while went to his host
1815 æþeling to yppan, þær se oþer wæs,
that Darling of Danes. The doughty atheling
1816 hæle hildedeor Hroðgar grette.

[...]

1853 [...] Me þin modsefa/
[...] Thy keen mind pleases me
1854 licað leng swa wel, leofa Beowulf/.
the longer the better, Beowulf loved!
1855 Hafast þu gefered þæt þam folcum sceal,
Thou hast brought it about that both our peoples,
1856 Geata leodum ond Gardenum,
sons of the Geat and Spear-Dane folk,
1857 sib gemæne/, ond sacu restan,
shall have mutual peace, and from murderous strife,
1858 inwitniþas, þe hie ær drugon,
such as once they waged, from war refrain.
1859 wesan, þenden ic wealde widan rices,
Long as I rule this realm so wide,
1860 maþmas gemæne, manig/ oþerne
let our hoards be common, let heroes with gold
1861 godum gegretan ofer ganotes bæð;
each other greet o'er the gannet's-bath

[...]

1896 þa wæs on sande sægeap naca
Then on the strand, with steeds and treasure
1897 hladen herewædum, hringedstefna,
and armor their roomy and ring-dight ship
1898 mearum ond maðmum; mæst hlifade
was heavily laden: high its mast
1899 ofer Hroðgares hordgestreonum.
rose over Hrothgar's hoarded gems.
1900 He þæm batwearde bunden golde
A sword to the boat-guard Beowulf gave,
1901 swurd gesealde, þæt he syðþan wæs
mounted with gold; on the mead-bench since
1902 on meodubence maþme/ þy weorþra/,
he was better esteemed, that blade possessing,
1903 yrfelafe. Gewat him on naca/
heirloom old. -- Their ocean-keel boarding,
1904 drefan deop wæter, Dena land ofgeaf.
they drove through the deep, and Daneland left.

[...]

Fra Beowulf v. Francis B. Gummere, Havard Classics, vol. 49, Collier 1910

 


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